plush toys for happy dogs

Plush Toy Certifications Standards

If you are wanting to check standards certifications for Plush Toys, here’s is a useful guide.

Firstly, determine whether your toys are to be for retail or for promotional giveaway, as standards for manufacturing and testings are not the same. Retail plushies need certified tests, whereas promotional plushies do not necessary need the certifications.

Moreover, toy safety standards tests should be carried out to meet international regulations. Please, use the following guide to get the idea of testing process and elements. However, you should remember, that it’s always the importer that is ultimately responsible for checking the legislation in their own country and ensuring compliance. You will need to investigate the rules of importing toys to your specific country very clearly before you proceed with production.

Plush Toy Certifications Standards

Australian Toys Safety About stuffed toys

A stuffed toy is a toy sewn from a textile and stuffed with a soft material, and is used as a comfort object by children of all ages.

Risks and injuries

Stuffed toys like teddy bears and cuddly dolls may seem harmless but their eyes, nose, hair, buttons and jewellery can pose a choking risk for children if not attached properly.

Children under three years old can suffer serious injuries or illness when playing with stuffed toys if they:

  • choke on small parts or filling that they have placed in their mouths or inhaled
  • swallow small parts or filling.

Buying tips

  • Ensure there are no small parts that can come off easily and become trapped in a child’s throat or windpipe.
  • Feel the toy for any sharp objects. A stuffed toy’s filling should be clean and free of objects or substances that may be harmful to a child.
  • Check seams are securely sewn. If synthetic material like nylon thread has been used, check that the ends of the threads are secure and will not come loose. Long and loose pieces of thread on a stuffed toy can cause strangulation and choking.
  • Only buy bean-bag style toys if you are sure the seams or material will not tear to allow the beans to escape. Polystyrene beads are particularly hazardous, as young children might inhale them.
  • Be aware that toys made from foam, such as bath blocks, may pose a choking risk if a child bites pieces off it. Foam toys are not recommended for children under three years of age.

Safe use

  • Check toys regularly to make sure any accessories or small parts remain securely attached so that children are safe from choking hazards.
  • If seams split, resew them straight away or dispose of the toy.
  • Never let a child under three years old play with toys that have small parts that could separate and cause choking.
  • Never use foam toys with children under three years old.

Commitment to Safety

The Australian Toy Association (ATA) is proud of our significant accomplishments in the area of toy safety. The ATA continues to work with the various regulators, both state and federally, Standards Australia, consumer groups and industry to continually advance product safety, both in Australia and around the world.

ATA represents more than 280 manufacturers, importers and retailers of toys, accounting for about 90% of all toys distributed in Australia. Our intention is simple: to help you keep your child safe during play.

Toy Safety Process

  • Safety is fundamental to the development and manufacture of toys.
  • Strict safety standards for toys have been developed over the years.
  • Toys are tested to ensure their compliance to these standards.
  • The toy safety process also allows for the possibility of a recall should a faulty toy be detected.
  • Recalls are a critical part of the toy safety chain. They are the “safety net” used in a robust testing system if an issue is identified with a product that has passed all safety tests and yet may still have the potential to cause damage.
  • In the case of a recall, the toy company who has supplied the product, the federal government and retailers who stock the product work together in a coordinated manner to get the affected products off shelves as soon as possible.
  • Check here for the Australian recall list http://www.recalls.gov.au/

How do I keep my play environment safe?

  • Age ratings – never mix toys meant for children of different ages. It can be dangerous for younger children to get hold of toys that are too old for them.
  • The toy box – have a regular clear out of your toy boxes to check loose fur, ripped seams, sharp or rough edges, loose eyes and noses, broken parts that may cause choking. If you find broken or damaged toys, throw them away. Please don’t pass them on – you may be handing on an accident to another parent’s child.
  • Tidy up! – it may sound obvious, but toys left on the floor or the stairs can cause accidents for the entire family.
  • Cot toys – take string toys out of the cot when your baby is about five months old to prevent strangulation. Remove activity centers as soon as your baby can pull to stand.
  • Battery toys – always change all batteries at once. New batteries can cause old batteries to get dangerously hot.
  • Garden toys – fix garden toys over grass or soil, never concrete. Make sure there is plenty of room to walk around a swing to avoid being hit by the swing seat. Empty paddling pools after use and store them deflated or upside down.

Different plush toys certifications for USA, Canada and EU:

  • USA

In the US we should follow ASTM tests, which includes:

– Mechanical/physical testing : ASTM F963-1

– Flammability testing : ASTM F963-2

– Chemical testing (8 kinds of heavy metal) : ASTM F963-3

Then CPSIA (Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act):

– Lead and phthalates test

– Labeling test

  • Canada

The Canadian toy standards are regulated by the CCPSA:

– Physical and mechanical testing : CCPSA SOR 2011-17-1

– Combustion testing: CCPSA SOR 2011-17-2

– Chemical testing (5 kinds of heavy metals): CCPSA SOR 2011-17-3

– Lead and mercury testing

  • European Union

The EU the toy safety will be regulated by the EN71

– Physical and institutional performance : EN71-1

– Combustion performance : EN71-2

– Chemical performance (19 kinds of heavy metal) : EN71-3

After passing the three tests of EN71, you can get the CE mark. It is vital for plush toys to bear a CE mark as it is a symbol of compliance to European health, safety and environmental standards.

Overall, it is important to have in mind and understand the different safety toy standards for the USA, Canada and EU to avoid your goods being seized.

Once you’re clear which countries you wish to sell toys to and know which certificates you need to obtain, you must also be aware of the pricing for these certifications.

Testing costs will depend on the number of different kinds of materials and the number of colours used in your plush toy.

The laboratory will cut the pieces of each kind of material and test them according to the parameters mentioned before (heavy metals, flammability etc.). Please note that the embroidery (such as eyes, mouth line etc.) on the product do not require testing.

Produce and approve the initial prototype to see how many colours and types of materials are used in it. Then send the prototype to an Authorised Laboratory in China, which will quote the costs accordingly. It is important to work only with factories that use high-quality materials guaranteed to pass all plush toys certifications.

Plush Toy Certifications Standards

Plush Toys Certifications and Labeling

After testings have been distinguished, working on label designs will be the next step before commencing production.

Rules for Labeling Plush Toys:

Information and languages placed on fabric labels will vary depending on the country you will be selling them in.

Points to include:

  • Client’s logo
  • Website
  • Origin (Made in China + Province for some countries)
  • Date of Production
  • Production Number (Invoice)
  • Composition
  • Mark “All new materials”
  • Name and address of importer or distributor
  • Icons about Washing only by hand, Do not iron, Dry clean
  • Age mark (3+, 0+)
  • List of certifications obtained

We have put together a template you can use for reference:

Everything You Should Know About Plush Toys Certifications and Labelling

Plush Toys Certifications and Labeling

Feel free to contact us for more details by email at info@www.theodmgroup.com

Commitment to Safety

The Australian Toy Association (ATA) is proud of our significant accomplishments in the area of toy safety. The ATA continues to work with the various regulators, both state and federally, Standards Australia, consumer groups and industry to continually advance product safety, both in Australia and around the world.

ATA represents more than 280 manufacturers, importers and retailers of toys, accounting for about 90% of all toys distributed in Australia. Our intention is simple: to help you keep your child safe during play.

Toy Safety Process

  • Safety is fundamental to the development and manufacture of toys.
  • Strict safety standards for toys have been developed over the years.
  • Toys are tested to ensure their compliance to these standards.
  • The toy safety process also allows for the possibility of a recall should a faulty toy be detected.
  • Recalls are a critical part of the toy safety chain. They are the “safety net” used in a robust testing system if an issue is identified with a product that has passed all safety tests and yet may still have the potential to cause damage.
  • In the case of a recall, the toy company who has supplied the product, the federal government and retailers who stock the product work together in a coordinated manner to get the affected products off shelves as soon as possible.
  • Check here for the Australian recall list http://www.recalls.gov.au/

How do I keep my play environment safe?

  • Age ratings – never mix toys meant for children of different ages. It can be dangerous for younger children to get hold of toys that are too old for them.
  • The toy box – have a regular clear out of your toy boxes to check loose fur, ripped seams, sharp or rough edges, loose eyes and noses, broken parts that may cause choking. If you find broken or damaged toys, throw them away. Please don’t pass them on – you may be handing on an accident to another parent’s child.
  • Tidy up! – it may sound obvious, but toys left on the floor or the stairs can cause accidents for the entire family.
  • Cot toys – take string toys out of the cot when your baby is about five months old to prevent strangulation. Remove activity centers as soon as your baby can pull to stand.
  • Battery toys – always change all batteries at once. New batteries can cause old batteries to get dangerously hot.
  • Garden toys – fix garden toys over grass or soil, never concrete. Make sure there is plenty of room to walk around a swing to avoid being hit by the swing seat. Empty paddling pools after use and store them deflated or upside down.

Finally if you do wish to promote and buy a toy business retail or for promotional giveaway, as standards for manufacturing and testings are not the same. Retail plushies need certified tests, whereas promotional plushies do not necessary need the certifications. Its is best to check with the relevant Industry Association in you state or country of trade and supplier. WI have covered a few main countries here.

Leave a comment